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Game Guidelines

By Doug Franklin June 1, 2010

Games are a part of my youth ministry strategy. I like games because students learn to work together and have tons of fun. They build relationships and create memories. I also like have some friendly and healthy competition. I know this makes me old-school, but competition seems to make games more fun and more dramatic. Here are a few guidelines I like to use when thinking about youth group games.

1. Everyone is moving all the time

I stay away from baseball or kickball because only two people are ever playing at one time. These games can get boring because most students are just standing around. Now in dodgeball, on the other hand, everyone is moving all the time except when your out. Games like this keep everyone involved and part of the action. Make sure that the games you’re playing have everyone involved at all times.

2. Everyone can play

Stay away from skill-based games. Basketball and volleyball are two games that will divide your group due to skill. Games like “capture the flag” only have one skill requirement…running.

3. Require Unity
Team building activities are great for this, and because they’re so much fun you can often use them as youth group games. Another game I like that focuses on unity is “junk food relays.” Students run back and forth from a big pile of junk food all having to eat a snickers bar (or some other junk food). This is great since every team member has to play and it doesn’t require much skill. The whole team will be cheering each other on as each participant eats the snickers bar. This and any relay can create tons of unity.

follow these guidelines and see the fun increase for all of your students.

About the Author

Doug Franklin

Doug Franklin is the president of LeaderTreks, an innovative leadership development organization focusing on students and youth workers. Doug and his wife, Angie, live in West Chicago, Illinois. They don’t have any kids, but they have 2 dogs that think they are children. Diesel and Penelope are Weimaraners  who never leave their side. Doug grew up in…  Read More